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Temple of Victory

Temple of Victory

This was a temple on the Palatine Hill on a site just to the east of the Temple of the Magna Mater. Remains of the foundations have been found. It was begun by the general L. Postumius Megellus using his share of the booty from the victory over the Samnites in 307 B.C. Finished in 294 B.C., it was rebuilt in the first century B.C. The festival day was August 1.

Aedes Victoria

From Samuel Ball Platner, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, rev. Thomas Ashby. Oxford: 1929, p. 570.

A temple on the Palatine hill, ascribed by tradition to Evander (Dionys. I.32.5), but actually built by L. Postumius Megellus out of fines levied by him during his aedileship, dedicated by him on 1st August (Fast. Praen. ad Kal. Aug., EE IX. No. 740; NS 1897, 421; Ant. ap. NS 1921, 104) when consul in 294 B.C. (Liv. X.33.9). During the years 204-191, while the temple of the Magna Mater was still being built, the sacred stone of that goddess was kept in the temple of Victoria (Liv. XXIX.14.13). Near it Cato afterwards built a shrine of Victoria Virgo (Liv. XXXV.9.6). There is no record of any restoration of this temple (AJA 1905, 438-440; Mem. Am. Acad. II.61), and its exact site is still uncertain. See CJ 1920, 297, where Chase states that Boni identified this temple with foundations found near the arch of Titus. It was doubtless on the Clivus Victoriae (q.v.), and remains of two dedicatory inscriptions (CIL VI.31049 = I2.805; 31060), found about 50 metres west of the present church of S. Teodoro, may indicate its position (HJ 47-49; WR 139; Gilb. III.428-429; LR 126-127).

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Additional source material

  • Ancient Library Sources (from Peter Aicher, Rome Alive: A Source Guide to the Ancient City, vol. 1, Bolchazy-Carducci: 2004) [Works cited]

    60. The Temple of Victory. Sources.

    60.1.

    Before joining his soldiers in Sora for battle against the Samnites, [in 294 BC] the consul Lucius Postumius dedicated the Temple of Victory, which he had built using money from fines he collected earlier as aedile.

    Livy, History 10.33.9

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  • German Archaeological Institute
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