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Pincian Hill

Pincian Hill

A hill to the north of Quirinal Hill. It housed several famous gardens (including those of Lucullus and Pompey), and was for centuries known as the Collis Hortulorum (“Hill of Gardens”). The name Pincian comes from the family of the Pincii which owned extensive properties here in the fourth century A.D.

Pincius Mons

From Samuel Ball Platner, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, rev. Thomas Ashby. Oxford: 1929, p. 391.

A hill divided from the Quirinal by the valley occupied by the Horti Sallustiani, running in a westerly direction from the Porta Salaria of the Aurelian Wall, and then north-north-west from the Porta Pinciana to the Muro Torto and then west again to the Porta Flaminia. It thus formed the east part of the seventh region. It was known in the early imperial period as Collis Hortulorum (Suet. Nero, 50; in Hist. Aug. Gord. iii.32 it is simply called collis — 'in campo Martio sub colle') and the post-classical name Mons Pincius comes from its owners in the fourth century A.D.: see Domus Pinciana, Horti Aciliorum, Horti LUCULL(I)ANI. The substructions of the last-named altered the contour of the hill considerably, and were made use of by Aurelian, who included them in his hastily erected enceinte. See HJ 444-450.

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