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Rome Reborn

Basilica of Constantine

Basilica of Constantine

Begun by Maxentius (A.D. 278-312) but completed in A.D. 312 by Constantine (A.D. 272?-337), this building was the last of the Roman civic basilicas. It housed a colossal statue of Constantine, the remains of which are in the courtyard of the Conservators' Palace of the Capitoline Museums.

Basilica Constantini

From Samuel Ball Platner, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, rev. Thomas Ashby. Oxford: 1929, p. 76-78.

Begun by Maxentius but completed by Constantine (Aur. Vict. Caes. 40.26: adhuc cuncta opera quae magnifice construxerat urbis fanum atque basilicam Flavii meritis patres sacravere) on the north side of the Sacra via, a site previously occupied, in part at least, by the horrea Piperataria (Chron. cit.) of Domitian. It was the last of the Roman basilicas, which it resembled less than it did the halls of the great thermae. Its proper designation appears to have fallen into disuse at an early period, for in the sixth century it was called templum Romae; (LPD I.280; Mél. 1886, 25 ff.; cf. however, BC 1900, 303), and in the seventh when Pope Honorius took its bronze tiles for the roof of St. Peter's (LPD I.323; cf. BC 1914, 106). The south aisle and the roof of the nave probably collapsed in the earthquake of Leo IV in 847 (LPD II.108; see Venus et Roma, templum).

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